ENGLISH POSTS

Iranian Hardline Cleric Says Protesters Should be Sentenced to Death

منتشرشده در

احمدخاتمی

A Friday prayer leader in Tehran has called for the death penalty to be issued to citizens who participated in the weeklong protests that erupted across Iran in December 2017.

“In our theology, the ruling against those who pour into the streets in opposition to a just Islamic ruler, cause fires or kill people… is death,” said Ayatollah Ahmad Khatami during a sermon on February 2, 2018.

Khatami is a member of the chairing committee of the Assembly of Experts, the constitutional body that select’s the country’s ruler.

He continued: “If you want to show mercy, that’s fine. But don’t give us the impression that you just want rioters to go free. There’s a time for mercy and there’s a time for rage. You have to be firm against the leaders of the riots, like Imam Ali.”

Shia Muslims regard Ali (601-661 AD) as the successor to the Prophet Muhammad.

“Those who were played and fooled should be chastised and woken up and should pledge not to commit mischief again by acting as mercenaries for agitators,” added Khatami.

At least 25 people were killed and thousands arrested in Iran’s December 2017 protests.

According to information obtained by the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI), some protesters arrested in Hamadan and Khuzestan provinces were already facing charges that are punishable by death before Khatami’s fiery sermon.

“Some of them have been investigated, interrogated and charged with ‘rebellion,’” said a legal source in the city of Izeh, Khuzestan Province, who spoke on the condition of anonymity for security reasons.

“The families of the freed detainees have been threatened a lot and are too afraid to talk,” added the source. “Most of them say that they are being slapped with serious charges and if they do anything wrong, they could be given heavy sentences.”

According to Article 279 of Iran’s Constitution: “Moharebeh (rebellion) is defined as drawing a weapon against the life, property or chastity of people or to cause terror as it creates the atmosphere of insecurity.”

According to Article 286: “Any person, who extensively commits felony against the bodily entity of people, offenses against the internal or international security of the state, spreading lies, disruption of the economic system of the state, arson and destruction of properties, distribution of poisonous and bacterial and dangerous materials, and establishment of, or aiding and abetting in, places of corruption and prostitution [on a scale] that causes severe disruption in the public order of the state and insecurity, or causes harsh damage to the bodily entity of people or public or private properties, or causes distribution of corruption and prostitution on a large scale, shall be considered as mofsed-e-fel-arz [corrupt on earth] and shall be sentenced to death.”

29 Arrested in Tehran for Public Protests against Forced Hijab

منتشرشده در

Dokhtaran-En-1.jpg

Police in Tehran have turned 29 people over to the judicial authorities for taking part in a growing campaign against forced hijab, the hardline Tasnim news agency reported on February 1, 2018. The detainees’ names have not been released.

The report quoted a police statement claiming the arrested protestors had been “fooled” by the “White Wednesdays” campaign. White Wednesdays was launched by exiled journalist and civil rights activist Masih Alinejad to encourage Iranian women who oppose mandatory hijab to wear a white scarf on Wednesdays and share their images on the My Stealthy Freedom page on Facebook.

The latest protests began in late December 2017, after a photo of Vida Movahed went viral among Iranians, which showed her standing on a sidewalk platform on Revolution St. in Tehran waving her white scarf on a stick like a flag.

Since then dozens of women, as well as some men, have posted images in a similar pose on social media using the Farsi hashtag “Girls of Revolution St.”

“The Girls of Revolution St. and many others who in recent days have protested against forced hijab by removing their scarves in the open, are not connected with the White Wednesdays campaign or other Iranian groups and activists based abroad,” an Iranian civil rights activist told the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI) on condition of anonymity.

“To suppress protests against forced hijab, which have always existed inside and outside Iran, the security and judicial establishment has accused domestic social movements of being guided from outside Iran.”

On January 29, Narges Hosseini was arrested in Tehran for mimicking Movahed’s pose. She remains in jail because her family could not afford the high bail amount set at $135,000 USD.

Movahed, 31, disappeared for a month after her photos appeared, resulting in Iranians expressing concern for her on social media with a hashtag translating to, “Where is the Girl from Revolution St?” English speakers followed suit with the hashtag, #Where_Is_She.

In late January, the Iranian human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh told CHRI that Movahed had been arrested and freed on bail.

Asked by reporters about the recent protests, Prosecutor General Mohammad Jafar Montazeri said on January 30, “I think this is a minor issue that our people are not paying any attention to.”

He added: “We have a population of about 80 million people and the vast majority of our women either wear the chador or have an appropriate hijab. In these circumstances, they will not allow the enemy to carry out its plans. It was a childish move for a young girl to take off her scarf in a place where people are living their normal lives and some people were assigned to post the films on the cyber network.”

“I think those who committed these acts did it mostly out of ignorance,” Montazeri continued. “Their emotions were stirred by foreign instigations. Most of our people are Muslim and observe religious laws. These actions do not have much of an impact. Anyone appearing on the street without a hijab is committing a crime and can be pursued by the law.”

Article 638 of Iran’s Islamic Penal Code states: “Women, who appear in public places and roads without wearing an Islamic hijab shall be sentenced to ten days to two months’ imprisonment or a fine of 50 thousand to five hundred rials.”

If protesters are also charged with national security violations, they can be put behind bars for many years.

Hardline Judge Keeps Iranian-American and Wife in Jail by Imposing $27 Million Bail

منتشرشده در

Cyrus-Vafadari-1-768x520
Family Meets Bail for Wife, but Judge Still Refuses to Release Her

The judge presiding over the case of imprisoned Iranian-American gallery owners Karan Vafadari and his wife Afarin Neyssari has deliberately imposed an extraordinarily heavy bail to prevent them from being released pending their appeal, the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI) has learned.

Karan’s son, Cyrus Vafadari, told CHRI on February 2, 2018, that Judge Abolqasem Salavati is demanding 100 billion tomans ($27 million USD) bail for the couple—50 billion tomans ($13.5 million) each for his father and Afarin Neyssari.

Vafadari’s son said that the family had “gone through a lot to pull together the bail” for Afarin, but when they came to post bail for her, Judge Salavati would not accept it, saying, “If I wanted her free, I wouldn’t have set [the bail] so high.”

“That left us wondering, if he didn’t plan to release her, why did he set any bail at all?” Cyrus said. “It seems that the judge has violated many laws,” he added.

Throughout the case, the couple have been subjected to blatant violations and denials of due process.

Judge Salavati refused to accept the imprisoned couple’s own lawyers and forced them to accept state-approved counsel, condemned Karan Vafadari and his wife to 27-year and 16-year prison sentences each respectively, in addition to the confiscation of their assets—disproportionately harsh sentences—and then acknowledged a huge bail was set in order to keep the couple in prison.

Refusing to release Afarin after her bail was met by the family is yet another violation this couple has been subjected to by a judiciary acting with complete disregard for the law.

Vafadari belongs to a prominent Zoroastrian family known in Tehran for their endowment to the city’s Firoozgar Hospital. Recognized in the Constitution, followers of the ancient, pre-Islamic Zoroastrian faith have lived in Iran for thousands of years but are subject to discrimination.

In a letter from Evin Prison Vafadari denounced the “unjust and tyrannical” 27-year prison sentence he and his wife were issued. The charges against Vafadari and Neyssari (who has US permanent residency) have not been officially publicized. But in a letter dated January 21, 2018, Vafadari said he was sentenced “last week” at a Revolutionary Court in Tehran for being a Zoroastrian dual national.

“The court has granted me the honor of being the first Iranian to be convicted under Article 989 of the Civil Penal Code… It means my wife and me, and every one of you dual national Zoroastrians who returned to your country to invest in the homeland you love are always going to be in danger of losing your assets and being forced to leave the country,” wrote Vafadari.

According to Article 989: “In case any Iranian subject acquired foreign nationality after the solar year 1280 (1901-1902) without the observance of the provisions of law, his foreign nationality will be considered null and void and he will be regarded as an Iranian subject. Nevertheless, all his landed properties will be sold under the supervision of the local public prosecutor and the proceeds will be paid to him after the deduction of the expenses of sale.”

The law also exempts these dual nationals from running for public office.

“Unfortunately, my international activities [in the art world] raised the suspicions of the IRGC’s Intelligence Organization,” added Vafadari. “Fortunately, the initial, baseless security accusations that led to our arrest were dropped, but our gallery, office, warehouses and home remained locked and our cars, computers and documents were confiscated, followed by accusations and interrogations that indicated a deeper plot.”

Vafadari wrote that his sentence, issued at Branch 15 of the Revolutionary Court in Tehran by the notoriously hardline Judge Salavati, includes 124 lashes and a fine of nine billion rials ($243,000 USD).

“Being a dual national is no longer a source of pride but a liability that could lead to your prosecution under the obsolete Article 989,” added Vafadari, who lives in Tehran with Neyssari.

Iranian attorney Mahmoud Alizadeh Tabatabaee told CHRI on January 30 that Article 989 only applies to individuals who have renounced their Iranian nationality. Vafadari and Neyssari have not renounced their citizenship.

“In my 25 years of experience I have never encountered a single such case,” said Tabatabaee.

“Girls of Revolution St” Protest Ignites Debate on Iran’s Compulsory Hijab

منتشرشده در

Dokhtaran-Fa
Iranian women protest their country’s hijab law by waving their headscarves in public.

Several women protested against Iran’s compulsory hijab law in the streets of Tehran and Isfahan on January 29 and 30, 2018, by publicly removing their headscarves and waving them like flags while standing on a platform.

The police detained at least one of the peaceful protesters, Narges Hosseini, who can’t afford to post her bail amount, the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI) has learned.

“The bail is too high and Hosseini’s family can’t afford it,” a source close to Hosseini told CHRI. “The assistant prosecutor agrees but he says Narges knows what a grave and dangerous act she committed.”

The women were mimicking the act of civil disobedience first exhibited by Vida Movahed on a sidewalk on Revolution St. in Tehran on December 27, 2017. Photos of Movahed’s silent protest went viral on social media, turning her into a symbol for women who oppose compulsory clothing regulations.

The 31-year-old disappeared for a month after the photos appeared, resulting in Iranians expressing concern for her on social media with a hashtag translating to, “Where is the Girl from Revolution St?” English speakers followed suit with the hashtag, #Where_Is_She.

Iranian attorney Nasrin Sotoudeh told CHRI that she visited the 128th Police Station in Tehran on January 28 and was informed that Movahed had been released on bail.

Now referred to as “The Girl From Revolution St.,” Movahed has been refusing interview requests.

Ongoing Protest

On January 29, several women in Tehran and one woman in Isfahan shared images of themselves on social media repeating Movahed’s peaceful protest.

Hosseini was arrested by the police on the morning of January 29 soon after she began waving her scarf on the street, the source close to Hosseini, who requested anonymity for security reasons, told CHRI.

She was transferred to Shahr-e Rey Prison, south of Tehran, and held on bail set at 500,000 million tomans ($135,000 USD).

Two hours after Hosseini’s protest, women in Tehran and Isfahan repeated the action and “The Girls of Revolution Street” became a hot topic of discussion among Iranians online.

Photos of women and men in different Iranian cities repeating the act were shared on social media throughout January 29 and 30.

Women’s rights activists in Iran have long protested the country’s paternalistic culture, which resists gender equality and favors men over females except when it comes to traditional roles, such as child rearing.

This culture pervades everyday life in Iran. For example, diyah (“blood money”), which is paid as compensation to victims who have experienced bodily harm at the hands of another, is paid to women at half the rate paid to men. The same applies to inheritances.

Court testimony by a woman is considered half as valuable as that of a man’s and married women cannot divorce or travel abroad without their husbands’ permission. Many university topics are also restricted to male students and women are also discouraged from joining—and discriminated against—in the workforce.

“The Girls of Revolution St. will mark a new era in Iran’s history,” tweeted Iranian writer Hossein Vahdani on January 29. “How glorious and meaningful it would be if these young women held the key to the liberation of this land from dictatorship.”

Political activist Mohammad Ghaznavian tweeted: “The action by the Girls of Revolution St. is the street manifestation of a group spirit; the overflow of decades of frustration aimed at breaking the chains of reactionary-ism, inequality and gender oppression.”

Women who voluntarily wear the hijab also expressed support for the protest, which emphasizes choice rather than restrictions.

“Wearing the hijab is my choice, not something forced on me by my family, society or the workplace,” tweeted Zahra Safyari on January 29. “I am happy with my choice but I am also against the mandatory hijab and admire the Girls of Revolution St.”

“There should be no compulsion in religion or with the hijab,” she added.

Meanwhile, a reformist politician criticized the act of civil disobedience.

“It appears that these are part of the same suspicious, organized actions that sparked the recent protests. This time they are targeting women. They are scheming to take protests to inside the home. These actions are not worthy of enlightened women who generally seek more freedoms and human and social rights,” said Tehran City Council adviser Fatemeh Rakeie on January 30.

The reformist councilmember, who also chairs the Society of New Thinking Muslim Women, advised people to ignore the protests.

“I don’t believe these are political or social crimes,” she said. “No one needs to be arrested. If society and enlightened women ignore them and don’t take them seriously, they will disappear on their own.”

Iranian-American Zoroastrian Denounces 27-Year “Unjust” Prison Sentence in Letter From Prison

منتشرشده در

Karen-Vafadari-Afarin.jpg

In a letter from Evin Prison obtained by the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI), Iranian-American dual national Karan Vafadari has denounced the “unjust and tyrannical” 27-year prison sentence he was issued in Tehran along with his Iranian wife, Afarin Neyssari, who was sentenced to 16 years in prison.

The charges against Vafadari and Neyssari (who has US permanent residency) have not been officially publicized. But in a letter dated January 21, 2018, Vafadari said he was sentenced “last week” at a Revolutionary Court in Tehran for being a Zoroastrian dual national.

“The court has granted me the honor of being the first Iranian to be convicted under Article 989 of the Civil Penal Code… It means my wife and me, and every one of you dual national Zoroastrians who returned to your country to invest in the homeland you love are always going to be in danger of losing your assets and being forced to leave the country,” wrote Vafadari.

According to Article 989: “In case any Iranian subject acquired foreign nationality after the solar year 1280 (1901-1902) without the observance of the provisions of law, his foreign nationality will be considered null and void and he will be regarded as an Iranian subject. Nevertheless, all his landed properties will be sold under the supervision of the local public prosecutor and the proceeds will be paid to him after the deduction of the expenses of sale.”

The law also exempts these dual nationals from running for public office.

“Unfortunately, my international activities [in the art world] raised the suspicions of the IRGC’s Intelligence Organization,” added Vafadari. “Fortunately, the initial, baseless security accusations that led to our arrest were dropped, but our gallery, office, warehouses and home remained locked and our cars, computers and documents were confiscated, followed by accusations and interrogations that indicated a deeper plot.”

Vafadari wrote that his sentence, issued at Branch 15 of the Revolutionary Court in Tehran by the notoriously hardline Judge Abolqasem Salavati, includes 124 lashes and a fine of nine billion rials ($243,000 USD).

“Being a dual national is no longer a source of pride but a liability that could lead to your prosecution under the obsolete Article 989,” added Vafadari, who lives in Tehran with Neyssari.

Iranian attorney Mahmoud Alizadeh Tabatabaee told CHRI on January 30 that Article 989 only applies to individuals who have renounced their Iranian nationality. Vafadari and Neyssari have not renounced their citizenship.

“In my 25 years of experience I have never encountered a single such case,” said Tabatabaee.

Property Confiscations

Vafadari belongs to a prominent Zoroastrian family known in Tehran for their endowment to the city’s Firoozgar Hospital. Recognized in the Constitution, followers of the ancient, pre-Islamic Zoroastrian faith have lived in Iran for thousands of years but are subject to discrimination.

In his letter, Vafadari wrote that before he was arrested, he was actively trying to regain some of his family’s confiscated assets through the Iranian legal system.

“Despite the chaos in the early days of the [1979] revolution, and even though my mother spent nine months in the same ward I am being kept in now, our family’s love for the land of our ancestors’ was so strong that they did not leave the country when more than half of our agricultural lands were confiscated in the name of khoms [Islamic tax] and more assets were taken away from us for different reasons,” he wrote.

In a letter to Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei dated December 2, 2016, Karan Vafadari’s sister, Kateh, noted that the couple had been arrested “to fabricate a case for the purpose of extortion and property seizure.”

The Islamic Republic has a documented history of unlawfully confiscating private property.

“We should talk about this case and reveal what has happened to Vafadari,” Koorosh Niknam, a former representative of the Zoroastrian community in Iran’s Parliament, told CHRI on January 30, 2018.

“His assets have been confiscated. What was his crime? They say they found wine in his home and he was in contact with foreign ambassadors. That cannot be the basis of such a heavy sentence,” he added.

Dual Nationals in Iran

Vafadari and Neyssari, art gallery owners in Tehran who are prominent in the Iranian artistic and cultural community, were arrested by the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps’ (IRGC) Intelligence Organization at Tehran’s Imam Khomeini International airport on July 20, 2016.

Two weeks later, Tehran Prosecutor Abbas Jafari Dolatabadi stated that “two Iranian dual nationals” had been charged with organizing mixed-gender parties for foreign diplomats and their Iranian associates and serving alcohol at their home.

According to the Constitution, Zoroastrians in Iran are not subject to Islamic laws on alcohol and mixed gatherings.

In March 2017, new charges were brought against the couple, including attempting to overthrow the Islamic Republic and recruiting spies through foreign embassies.

In recent months, the issue of dual nationals living in Iran has become a matter of public discussion in the Iranian Parliament.

“The Iranian nationality of people with dual nationalities will not be nullified, rather, their foreign nationality will not be recognized,” said Hossein Naghavi Hosseini, the spokesman for the Parliamentary Committee for National Security, on January 7.

Vafadari’s Warnings to Iranian Zoroastrians

Writing about the discrimination suffered by Zoroastrians in Iran, Vafadari pointed to the case of Zoroastrian council member Sepanta Niknam, who was suspended from the city council in the city of Yazd in September 2017 for his faith.

Iran’s Guardian Council has declared that religious minorities should not be allowed to run for office in Muslim-majority districts. Despite this, one of its members has stated that in some ways, religious minorities in Iran have it better than the country’s Muslim-majority population.

“According to [Guardian Council member] Ayatollah Modarresi Yazdi, the benefits granted to minorities by the Islamic state have no precedent in the world and, for their private use, they can enjoy some the things that are banned for Muslims,” wrote Vafadari.

Vafadari, who as a Zoroastrian is allowed to keep alcohol in his home, added: “I don’t recommend that you make wine at your own home. I thought this was not illegal for the Zoroastrians who have had wine in their culture for more than 5,000 years. For this, I have been given a year and a half in prison, condemned to 74 lashes and fined 140 million tomans ($38,000 USD).”

“Secondly, don’t accept alcoholic drinks as gifts from your friends and foreign diplomats, even if they brought them into the country from legal customs’ channels, because you could also be sentenced to three years in prison and a six billion rial ($162,000 USD) fine, like I have,” he added.

“Thirdly, with the approaching festivities such as the new year [March 21], I implore my fellow Zoroastrians to act cautiously for their own good,” continued Vafadari. “The reason is that holding mixed [gender] gatherings, which are very normal for us… will be seen as promoting indecency and they will sentence you to 15 years in prison for so-called corruption and depravity like I have.”

Vafadari also criticized Zoroastrian MP Esfandiar Ekhtiari for failing to prevent his prosecution.

He wrote: “In the end, I should say that if you get entangled in a legal misunderstanding, or if you refuse to ‘cooperate’ with the authorities and are chosen for a ‘hot branding,’ in the words of a judicial official, aimed at discouraging others, do not have expectations from anyone, not even Mr. Ekhtiari, the honorable representative of the Zoroastrian community in Parliament.”

“Unfortunately, he is overlooking the violations of my rights as a citizen during the judicial process under interrogation and after,” he added.

Unable to Locate Activists, Iran’s Intelligence Ministry Illegally Detains Their Family Members

منتشرشده در

3-PRISONERS-En.jpg

The Iranian Intelligence Ministry has illegally detained or summoned close relatives of at least three activists from northwestern Iran since anti-government protests erupted in the region in late December 2017, the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI) has learned.

“One of the main principles of modern law is that… everyone is responsible for their own actions,” Iranian attorney Mohammad Moghimi told CHRI on January 22, 2018. “Ethics, fairness and justice dictate that no one should be punished for another person’s crimes.”

“This principle has been in [Iran’s] Islamic Penal Code for 1,400 years,” he added. “If we disregard it, we will slip back into ancient times when suspects’ relatives were punished for unrelated crimes.”

Agents of the Intelligence Ministry detained the father of Kurdish journalist Arsalan Yarahmadi in late December 2017 in Kermanshah Province.

“I work for the Hengaw news agency, which only publishes news about human rights in Kurdistan,” Yarahmadi told CHRI. “It does not publish any political news. But on the second day of protests in the area on December 30, agents went to our house and detained my father.”

He added: “This is not the first time my family has been harassed. But this time they kept my father in detention for three days and told him that I had insulted and disrespected the supreme leader of the Islamic Republic. This is not true at all. We do not publish political news. We only cover human rights issues in Kurdistan.”

Yarahmadi said his father was released on 50 million tomans bail, approximately $13,600 USD.

“My activities have nothing to do with my father,” he said. “How can they detain and harass him? This is completely inhumane. I will follow up with human rights organizations.”

Omid Aghdami, a senior member of the Society for the Defense of Children’s Rights in Tabriz, told CHRI that his mother was summoned to the Intelligence Ministry’s office in Tabriz on January 21 and interrogated for six hours.

“They asked her questions about my exact location since I escaped Iran and about the people who have visited our house,” said Aghdami, who has been living in exile since November 2017. “They accused my mother of helping me escape and threatened to prosecute her.”

“She has been banned from leaving the city,” he added.

CHRI has also learned that art student Aydin Mohsennejad’s father (first name unknown) was detained in early January. Aydin Mohsennejad is the editor-in-chief of Jame’eh (Society) magazine, a student publication.

The University Trade Unions’ Council of Iran (UTUCI) reported that Intelligence Ministry agents raided Aydin Mohsennejad’s home without a warrant on January 5 and confiscated some of his personal belongings. After failing to locate Aydin, the agents took his father to the Central Prison in Khoy, West Azerbaijan Province.

Detainees Arrested in Iranian Protests Facing Charges That Carry Death Penalty

منتشرشده در

EterazatIze.jpg

Some detainees arrested in the protests that broke out in Iran’s Hamadan and Khuzestan provinces in December 2017 are facing charges that are punishable by death, the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI) has learned.

“Some of them have been investigated, interrogated and charged with ‘rebellion,’” said a legal source in the city of Izeh, Khuzestan Province, who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals.

“The families of the freed detainees have been threatened a lot and are too afraid to talk,” added the source. “Most of them say that they are being slapped with serious charges and if they do anything wrong, they could be given heavy sentences.”

During the protests approximately 400 people were arrested in Izeh. To date, approximately 50 of them remain in detention.

A legal source in Hamedan Province told CHRI that the exact number of detainees there is not known, but many of them, arrested mainly in the cities of Asadabad and Touyserkan, have been charged with “corruption on earth” and “rebellion,” which could result in the death penalty.

Exact casualty figures have not been released but according to official sources, three to six people died in those cities during the protests. Their identities have not been revealed.

According to Article 279 of Iran’s Constitution: “Moharebeh (rebellion) is defined as drawing a weapon against the life, property or chastity of people or to cause terror as it creates the atmosphere of insecurity.”

Officials have not indicated who has been charged with drawing a weapon at the protests, however, security forces harshly repressed the demonstrations, which occurred in dozens of Iranian cities, with water cannons, tear gas, rubber bullets and live fire.

Iranian officials have also referred to the protests as “blind, violent riots.”

According to Article 286 of the Constitution: “Any person, who extensively commits felony against the bodily entity of people, offenses against the internal or international security of the state, spreading lies, disruption of the economic system of the state, arson and destruction of properties, distribution of poisonous and bacterial and dangerous materials, and establishment of, or aiding and abetting in, places of corruption and prostitution [on a scale] that causes severe disruption in the public order of the state and insecurity, or causes harsh damage to the bodily entity of people or public or private properties, or causes distribution of corruption and prostitution on a large scale, shall be considered as mofsed-e-fel-arz [corrupt on earth] and shall be sentenced to death.”

Several protesters arrested in Iran’s 2009 demonstrations were also issued harsh legal charges. The defendants were ultimately spared the death penalty, however, two political prisoners were executed during that time.

At least 25 people died and more than 3,700 were arrested during the weeklong protests that broke out across dozens of Iranian cities on December 28, 2017. Human rights organizations and lawyers have expressed serious concerns for detainees, many of whom are being held without access to a lawyer.

At least two protesters have died in custody.

A protest rally in support of the people’s demonstrations against the corrupt Islamic regime, Saturday 13th of January 2018 in front of Iranian Embassy in London

منتشرشده در

Women-Struggle-in-Iran-Dey-1396

In addition to suppressing, arresting, beatings and firing tear gas, the Islamic regime tried to prevent protest rallies by using water sprinklers. The Islamic Republic, which has survived only by the slaughter and repression of the people, is submissively trying to reduce the energy of the social explosion in various ways.

In recent days, dozens of protesters have killed, hundreds have been injured and thousands have been arrested or subjected to arrest.

Persian solidarity  invites you to come and join us in the opportunity of a public gathering to overthrow the corrupt Islamic regime

In front of the Iranian embassy in London on Saturday 13th of January 2018 at 14:00 hours.

16 Princes Gate

Knightsbridge

London

SW7 1PT

Dedicated to all those who struggle for freedom and democracy for Iran

Long live freedom, long live Iran

Ahmadi

Iran: Investigate reports of protester deaths in custody

منتشرشده در

 

download

The Iranian authorities must immediately investigate reports that at least five people have died in custody following a crackdown on anti-establishment protests, and take all necessary steps to protect detainees from torture and prevent any further deaths, Amnesty International said today.

“The shroud of secrecy and lack of transparency over what happened to these detainees is alarming. Instead of rushing to the judgment that they committed suicide, the authorities must immediately launch an independent, impartial, and transparent investigation, including independent autopsies,” said Magdalena Mughrabi, Amnesty International’s Deputy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

“We have long documented the nightmarish conditions in detention facilities in Iran, including the use of torture. Those suspected of having any responsibility for these deaths should be suspended from their positions and prosecuted in proceedings that respect international fair trial standards and without recourse to the death penalty.”

Fears over the welfare of hundreds of detainees have been heightened by the death of Sina Ghanbari, 23, who was held in the ‘quarantine’ section of Tehran’s Evin prison, where detainees are held for processing immediately after being arrested. There have been conflicting reports about the circumstances surrounding Ghanbari’s death, with activists disputing the authorities’ claims that he had committed suicide.

Since then, at least four further deaths in custody have been reported, including another two deaths in Evin’s ‘quarantine’ section, according to prominent human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh. The identities of these two individuals are currently unknown. At least two others who were arrested during the crackdown – Vahid Heydari and Mohsen Adeli – died in custody in Arak, Markazi province and Dezfoul, Khuzestan province this month, according to reports. In all four cases, activists and several family members have disputed official claims that these detainees committed suicide.

Many relatives of the hundreds of people detained have reported that they have been unable to access information about their loved ones, and that they have faced intimidation and threats by the authorities even for making enquiries.

“The authorities must not only inform family members of detainees’ whereabouts, but also allow families to visit detainees and ensure they have legal representation. Nobody should face reprisals for inquiring about the whereabouts of a loved one or seeking truth about their fate,” said Magdalena Mughrabi.