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Report image of demonstrations of Iranian residents living in England in front of the Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Iran in support of protesters in Iran, London 13.01.2018

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Dedicated to all those who struggle for freedom and democracy for Iran

Long live freedom, long live Iran

Ahmadi

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A protest rally in support of the people’s demonstrations against the corrupt Islamic regime, Saturday 13th of January 2018 in front of Iranian Embassy in London

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In addition to suppressing, arresting, beatings and firing tear gas, the Islamic regime tried to prevent protest rallies by using water sprinklers. The Islamic Republic, which has survived only by the slaughter and repression of the people, is submissively trying to reduce the energy of the social explosion in various ways.

In recent days, dozens of protesters have killed, hundreds have been injured and thousands have been arrested or subjected to arrest.

Persian solidarity  invites you to come and join us in the opportunity of a public gathering to overthrow the corrupt Islamic regime

In front of the Iranian embassy in London on Saturday 13th of January 2018 at 14:00 hours.

16 Princes Gate

Knightsbridge

London

SW7 1PT

Dedicated to all those who struggle for freedom and democracy for Iran

Long live freedom, long live Iran

Ahmadi

Iran: Investigate reports of protester deaths in custody

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The Iranian authorities must immediately investigate reports that at least five people have died in custody following a crackdown on anti-establishment protests, and take all necessary steps to protect detainees from torture and prevent any further deaths, Amnesty International said today.

“The shroud of secrecy and lack of transparency over what happened to these detainees is alarming. Instead of rushing to the judgment that they committed suicide, the authorities must immediately launch an independent, impartial, and transparent investigation, including independent autopsies,” said Magdalena Mughrabi, Amnesty International’s Deputy Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

“We have long documented the nightmarish conditions in detention facilities in Iran, including the use of torture. Those suspected of having any responsibility for these deaths should be suspended from their positions and prosecuted in proceedings that respect international fair trial standards and without recourse to the death penalty.”

Fears over the welfare of hundreds of detainees have been heightened by the death of Sina Ghanbari, 23, who was held in the ‘quarantine’ section of Tehran’s Evin prison, where detainees are held for processing immediately after being arrested. There have been conflicting reports about the circumstances surrounding Ghanbari’s death, with activists disputing the authorities’ claims that he had committed suicide.

Since then, at least four further deaths in custody have been reported, including another two deaths in Evin’s ‘quarantine’ section, according to prominent human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh. The identities of these two individuals are currently unknown. At least two others who were arrested during the crackdown – Vahid Heydari and Mohsen Adeli – died in custody in Arak, Markazi province and Dezfoul, Khuzestan province this month, according to reports. In all four cases, activists and several family members have disputed official claims that these detainees committed suicide.

Many relatives of the hundreds of people detained have reported that they have been unable to access information about their loved ones, and that they have faced intimidation and threats by the authorities even for making enquiries.

“The authorities must not only inform family members of detainees’ whereabouts, but also allow families to visit detainees and ensure they have legal representation. Nobody should face reprisals for inquiring about the whereabouts of a loved one or seeking truth about their fate,” said Magdalena Mughrabi.

Internet Cut-Off During Recent Unrest in Iran Reveals Tehran’s New Cyber Capabilities

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New Report Details Growing State Ability to Block, Censor and Monitor the Internet in Iran

January 10, 2018—The recent unrest in Iran—during which the authorities disrupted Iranians’ access to the internet and blocked major social media networks used by the protesters—demonstrates that the Iranian government’s decade-long effort to control the internet in Iran is being realized.

In a major new report released today, Guards at the Gate: The Expanding State Control Over the Internet in Iran, the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI) details the advances the Iranian government has made in controlling cyberspace in Iran, and the resulting losses to internet freedom and privacy.

The 76-page report provides a comprehensive review of Iran’s internet policies and initiatives, in particular, the development and new capabilities of Iran’s state-controlled National Internet Network (NIN), which gives the government newly expanded abilities to control Iranians’ access to the internet and monitor online communications.

“The Iranian government has now shown the world that it can—and will—cut its citizens off from the global internet, in total disregard for the rights of the Iranian people,” said Hadi Ghaemi, executive director of CHRI.

Key findings of Guards at the Gate:

The NIN enables the authorities to separate domestic internet traffic from international internet traffic, allowing the state to cut Iranians off from the global internet while maintaining access to state-approved domestic sites and services on the NIN. The government demonstrated this capability for the first time in December 2017 as unrest broke out around the country: The authorities disrupted internet access through slowdowns and the blocking of circumvention tools on December 29—and briefly cut-off internet access on December 30 while domestic NIN traffic continued unhindered—in addition to blocking the Instagram social media site and the Telegram messaging app used by the protesters.
Without any judicial oversight, Iran’s NIN can be used by state security agencies to identify users and hack into private accounts. The stakes are especially high when it comes to internet security: many Iranians serve long prison sentences for online communications disapproved of by the state. State-sponsored DDoS attacks, phishing, malware, and message interception have all increased during Rouhani’s tenure.
The NIN also allows the state to more effectively filter and manipulate online content. Iran’s national search engines now automatically block keywords and phrases and send users to sites that deliver state-approved and sometimes fabricated content.
The state steers Iranians towards the NIN and its services—such as national search engines, email and video services—by making it cheaper and faster to use than the global internet, violating net neutrality principles.
President Rouhani, while publicly stating support for internet freedom, has increased internet filtering, accelerated development of the NIN, and during his tenure millions of websites continue to be blocked and major social media platforms remain banned—even as his administration has expanded internet use in Iran by making it faster and cheaper, and on occasion has reversed the blocking of some messaging apps.
Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has consolidated control over Iran’s internet policies and development of the country’s telecommunications infrastructure under hardline organizations and security agencies that are under his authority and which view internet freedom as a threat, in a significant institutional shift that will profoundly harm internet access and privacy in Iran.
“Iran is grouping itself among the autocracies of the world by violating its people’s rights to internet freedom and privacy,” said Ghaemi. “Governments worldwide should express their deep concern over these violations directly to their Iranian counterparts.”

Inside Guards at the Gate:

Comprehensive review of internet policies and technological developments in Iran over the last five years, with emphasis on the new internet blocking and surveillance capabilities of Iran’s NIN.
Analysis of the increasingly sophisticated nature of internet censorship in Iran, including the intensified filtering of encryption tools and the use of fabricated online content.
Discussion of the tools and methods of state-sponsored cyberattacks in Iran.
Guards at the Gate: The Expanding State Control Over the Internet in Iran builds on years of extensive research and reporting by CHRI on internet freedom and security issues in Iran and the growing technological capabilities of the state. The report provides a comprehensive understanding of the significant advancements the Iranian government has made over the last five years, and the implications these new capabilities have for Iranians’ access to the internet and their ability to communicate privately and safely online.

A protest rally in support of the people’s demonstrations against the corrupt Islamic regime

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In the past few days in different cities of Iran, we have witnessed a vast and massive gatherings of people’s protest to the centers of power and symbols of the Islamic Republic of Iran by  people.

In addition to suppressing, arresting, beatings and firing tear gas, the Islamic regime tried to prevent protest rallies by using water sprinklers. The Islamic Republic, which has survived only by the slaughter and repression of the people, is submissively trying to reduce the energy of the social explosion in various ways.

In recent days, dozens of protesters have killed, hundreds have been injured and thousands have been arrested or subjected to arrest.

Persian solidarity  invites you to come and join us in the opportunity of a public gathering to overthrow the corrupt Islamic regime

In front of the Iranian embassy in London on 6 January 2018 at 14:00 hours.

16 Princes Gate

Knightsbridge

London

SW7 1PT

Dedicated to all those who struggle for freedom and democracy for Iran

Long live freedom, long live Iran

Ahmadi

Iranian Authorities Confiscate Prominent Director’s Passport, Ban Him From Making Films

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Award-winning director Mohammad Rasoulof has revealed that he has been banned from making films in Iran and is not allowed to leave the country.

“As soon as I arrived at Tehran’s international airport [on September 11, 2017], two individuals came to me at the passport checkpoint and took me to a room where they confiscated my passport and personal belongings,” Rasoulof told the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI) on December 23, 2017.

“Two hours later they returned my personal belongings but kept my passport and told me I should appear at the Culture and Media Court,” he added. “But a few days later, I received a summons telling me not to appear in court until further notice.”

Rasoulof’s passport was confiscated after he returned to Iran in September 2017 after winning the Un Certain Regard prize at the Cannes Film Festival for “A Man of Integrity.” The film, which has not received a permit to be screened in Iran, focuses on corruption in the Islamic Republic.

“Then, on October 3, I was questioned for more than four and a half hours by three individuals who asked me about all my films, especially ‘A Man of Integrity’ and ‘Manuscripts Don’t Burn,’” which is about murders carried out by Iran’s Intelligence Ministry in the 1990s,” said Rasoulof.

He continued: “From the start, it became clear that the gentlemen questioning me were from the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps’ (IRGC) Intelligence Organization. They told me I am charged with ‘assembly and collusion against national security’ and ‘propaganda against the state.”

“They literally said their office works independently without any supervision,” he added.

Rasoulof was prosecuted on the same charges in March 2010 along with fellow dissident filmmaker Jafar Panahi and sentenced to six years in prison. Upon appeal, the sentence was reduced to one year in prison but has not been enforced.

Giving more details about his questioning by the IRGC intelligence agents, Rasoulof said, “They were very angry. They insisted that I had smeared the values of the [1979] revolution in my films.”

“One of the interrogators said frankly that independent cinema is a joke and should be banned,” he added. “I told him that if independent cinema is a joke, why don’t you let me tell my jokes?

He continued: “Then I was questioned about one of the stories in ‘A Man of Integrity’ and they were adamant that I was defending Baha’ism. I explained that one of the topics in the film is discrimination in Iran. I did not defend any particular group or ideology in my film but it is my right to protest the ruling establishment’s denial of basic rights to certain groups of people.”

Iran’s Constitution does not recognize the Baha’i faith as an official religion. Although Article 23 states that “no one may be molested or taken to task simply for holding a certain belief,” followers of the faith are denied many basic rights as one of the most severely persecuted religious minorities in the country.

“They said I am banned from making films and should come back for more questioning,” Rasoulof told CHRI. “Two months have passed and I am still waiting in limbo.”

Rasoulof revealed that two colleagues who have worked on his films, including producer Kaveh Farnam, have also been banned from traveling outside Iran.

“We all know that in Iran’s political structure, power is concentrated in a place that takes away the authority of the executive branch, headed by the president, in implementing the law,” he said.

“We are still witnessing films, which were approved for public screening, being postponed because of threats and attacks by [religious] radicals,” added Rasoulof. “The Culture and Islamic Guidance Ministry cannot even defend its own decisions.”